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Natural Cognitive Enhancers

  • Categories:News
  • Time of issue:2022-03-23 10:19

Natural Cognitive Enhancers

  • Categories:News
  • Time of issue:2022-03-23 10:19

 

Natural cognitive enhancers - nourish the brain to think clearer

 

The brain represents around 2 percent(around 3 pounds) of a person’s weight but uses 20 percent of the body energy.[1] It’s a super complex organ that consists of around 86 billion neurons.[2] With the help of new technologies(e.g., imaging techniques), the knowledge about the brain is progressing significantly. The good news is that brain can grow at any age. However, there are still vast unknowns to be explored.

To enhance cognition function, a holistic approach is crucial for all ages. This can be achieved by a lifestyle plan, referring to an acronym—NEURO—covering the most important lifestyle elements. “N” for Nutrition, “E” for Exercise, “U” for Unwind (stress management), “R” for Restorative Sleep, and “O” for Optimizing mental and social activity.[3] It’s worth mentioning that dementia, unfortunately, is the fastest-growing epidemic in developed nations. Therefore, these preventative interventions are especially important for everyone to live life to the fullest in this era.

Brain tonic, or so-called nootropic, functions as ‘cognitive enhancers’, which improves cognitive function, memory, creativity, or motivation in healthy individuals.[4] Although the term nootropic is relatively recent, herbal practitioners have been using plants as a source of rejuvenation for the brain and nervous system for thousands of years.[5]Natural extract contains antioxidants that can eliminate free radicals that may damage the brain. It also aids brain cell regeneration and supports neural blood flow.

Nowadays, almost everyone has used brain tonic, namely caffeine in coffee and tea. Food as a clean source is believed to be the best way to obtain nutrients, thus, caffeine is not included in the recommended ingredient list.

 

Product Botanical/Latin name Specification Test method Part used
Ginkgo Biloba Extract Ginkgo biloba L. EP.8 (Ginkgolic acids≤1ppm) HPLC Leaf
Bacopa Monnieri Extract Bacopa monnieri (L.) wettst. Bacosides 50% UV Stem, leaf
Panax Ginseng Extract Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer Panaxosides≥80% UV Stem, leaf and root
Microalgae DHA powder NA ≥10.0% NA Microalgae
L-Theanine Camellia sinensis (L.) ≥40.0%/ ≥98.0% HPLC Leaf
Lion’s Mane Extract Hericium erinaceus Polysaccharides≥30%/Polysacc harides≥25%,Beta glucan≥10% UV(and Megazyme) Fruit body
Sage Extract Salvia japonica thunb Rosmarinci acid ≥2.5% HPLC Bark
Pine bark Extract Pinus massoniana Lamb Proanthocyanidins≥95% UV Bark

 

 

Brain tonic

 

Note:

1) Country of origin: China. Except for raw material of Bacopa Monnieri being imported from India, other raw materials of

these botanicals are cultivated in China.

2) Other grades may be available after consultation. Third-party test reports are possible upon your request.

3) Standard packaging is 25kg/drum and shelf-life is 24 months.

4) L-Theanine has another source(i.e., 98.0% ~102.0%, HPLC) that originates from L-Pyroglutamic acid.

5) Regarding sage, Salvia officinalis, S. lavandulaefolia and S. miltiorrhiza are particularly notable for their reputed beneficial

effects on cognitive function. [6][7][8]

 

 

Note:

1) Free samples of the above-mentioned ingredients are available upon your request.
2) According to EFSA, an AI(adequate intake) for DHA+EPA is set at 250 mg/day for adults and young children(older than 1
year). For special groups, AI of DHA is set to be 100 to 200 mg/day during pregnancy and lactation, as well as 100 mg/day for
older infants (6-12 months). [9]For other above-mentioned ingredients, there is no established RDI at this moment.

 

Monographs:
 

Ginkgo biloba has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for 5000 years. It is
widely used for its potential effects on memory and cognition.[10] Ginkgo is native to
China and now it’s widely growing in Asia, North America and Europe.
Ginkgo biloba contains different components such as flavonoids, terpene trilactones,
proanthocyanidines, ginkgolic acids, biflavone, polyflavones and ginkgotoxins. [11][12]
Selected research studies:
The dose-dependent cognitive effects of acute administration of Ginkgo biloba to healthy young volunteers(Kennedy et.al. 2000)
[13]
In a placebo-controlled, multi-dose, double-blind, balanced, crossover study design, 20 participants received a single dose of 120 mg, 240 mg and
360 mg of Ginkgo or a matching placebo. The results demonstrated a dose-dependent improvement of the 'speed of attention' factor.
Neuropsychological changes after 30-day Ginkgo biloba administration in healthy participants(Stough et.al. 2001)[14]
61 participants enrolled in a 30-d randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial and they were administered either a placebo or a 120
mg Ginkgo biloba. The study has shown significant improvements in speed of information processing working memory and executive processing.
 

Bacopa monnieri has been used for more than 3000 years in Indian Ayurvedic
medicines and is traditionally known for its memory-enhancing properties as well as
reducing anxiety. [15][16]
Bacopa monnieri contains alkaloid brahmine, nicotinine, herpestine, bacosides A and
B, saponins A, B and C, triterpenoid saponins, stigmastanol,etc. [17]
Selected research studies: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on cognitive effects of Bacopa monnieri
extract(Kongkeaw et.al.2014)[17]
Nine studies met the inclusion criteria with data of 518 subjects. This meta-analysis suggests that Bacopa monnieri has the potential to improve
cognition, particularly speed of attention.
Examining the nootropic effects of a special extract of Bacopa monniera on human cognitive functioning: 90 day double-blind
placebo-controlled randomized trial(Stough et.al. 2008) [18]
107 healthy participants(aged 18 to 60 years) participated in this study with administration of Bacopa monniera (2 × 150 mg) or placebo for 90
days. The treatment group exhibited significantly improved performance on the ‘Working Memory’ factor, more specifically spatial working
memory accuracy.
 

Panax ginseng (Asian ginseng) is described as the “king herb” and it has shown positive
effects on improving cognition function [19] . It is native to the Far East (most notably
China and Korea). [20]
The active constituents of the Panax spp. are ginsenoside saponins, which are divided
into Panaxadiol, Panaxatriol, and oleanolic acid groups. The Panaxadiol and Panaxatriol
groups are studied to increase the release of neurotransmitters in the brain. [21]
Selected research studies: Ginseng for cognition(Geng et.al. 2010) [22]
The study accesses five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, pooling data of 289 participants, investigating the effects of
ginseng on healthy participants. Results suggest ginseng improves some aspects of cognitive function, behavior and quality of life.
Single doses of Panax ginseng (G115) reduce blood glucose levels and improve cognitive performance during sustained mental
activity(Reay et.al. 2005) [23]
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover design, 30 healthy young adults consumed a single-dose of placebo, 200mg or
400mg of Panax ginseng. Overall, these data exhibits that Panax ginseng can improve cognitive performance and subjective feelings of mental
fatigue during sustained mental activity
 

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plays an important role in neural function, such as
memory and attention. [24][25] Fatty fish is an excellent dietary source of omega-3 and
other omega-3-rich dietary sources include vegetables, nuts, and seeds. [26]
Omega-3 fatty acids(contain EPA and DHA), a more commercially available form, are
also well known for their positive effects on heart and cardiovascular function. [27]
Selected research studies: DHA supplementation improved both memory and reaction time in healthy young adults: a
randomized controlled trial(Stonehouse et.al.2013) [24]
176 healthy adults enrolled in a 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind intervention in which they consumed 1.16 g DHA/d or a
placebo. DHA supplementation shows improved memory among young adults whose habitual diets were low in DHA.
Docosahexaenoic acid for reading, cognition and behavior in children aged 7–9 years: a randomized, controlled trial (the DOLAB
Study)( Richardson et.al.2012) [28]
A total of 362 healthy children aged 7–9 who were underperforming received 600 mg DHA/day or a matching placebo for 16 weeks. DHA
supplementation significantly improved reading. While no significant effects on memory were exhibited.
 

L-Theanine, an amino acid found abundant in tea leaves, which has been shown to
affect brain functions by relieving stress disorders, improving mood, and maintaining
normal sleep.[29][30]
Apart from L-Theanine, other major constituents of green tea also have substantial
benefits on cognitive function, namely tea catechins(primarily EGCG) and caffeine,
which typically account for 30–42% and 2-5% of dry weight of brewed green tea,
respectively. [31]
Selected research studies: Effects of L-theanine administration on stress-related symptoms and cognitive functions in healthy
adults: a randomized controlled trial(Hidese et.al. 2019) [32]
30 individuals (age: 48.3 ± 11.9 years) received L-theanine (200 mg/day) or placebo tablets for four-week administration. The results of cognitive
functions showed an improvement indicated by verbal fluency and executive function, as well as potential to promote mental health.
Effects of L-theanine on cognitive function in middle-aged and older subjects: A randomized placebo-controlled study(Baba et.al.
2021) [33]
69 Japanese men and women aged 50–69 took one capsule per day of placebo or 100.6 mg L-theanine for 12 weeks. The results suggest that L
theanine may contribute to improving attention, thus enhancing working memory and executive functions.
 

Traditionally, Lion’s mane has been used to fortify the spleen, nourish the gut, as well
as an anticancer drug. [34] Lion’s mane grows in forests of Asia, North America and
Europe and it’s used as both food and medicine in parts of Asia.
The mostly researched bioactive compounds of Lion’s mane are Hericerin,
Erinacines, Erinacerin, Glycoprotein, Polysaccharides, Sterols, Vitamin B12[c
lactone].[35]
Selected research studies: Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus) on mild cognitive
impairment: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial(Mori et.al. 2009) [36]
30 subjects (50 to 80-year-old) Japanese men and women diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment took 250 mg tablets (96% dry powder) or
placebo three times a day for 16 weeks. The results suggest that lion’s mane is effective in improving mild cognitive impairment.
Improvement of cognitive functions by oral intake of Hericium erinaceus(Saitsu et.al. 2019) [37]
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-group comparative study, 31 participants above 50 years old with intact cognition
consumed 4 capsules (0.8 g each) of lion’s mane/day for 12 weeks. Significant improvement in cognitive was demonstrated in the lion’s mane
group compared to placebo.
 

Salvia plants are traditionally noted for their antioxidant effects and ability to
enhance ‘head and brain’ function, improve memory, quicken the senses, and delay
age-associated cognitive decline. [38] Many species of Salvia are native to
Mediterranean Europe and there are over 900 species of sage growing throughout
the world. [39]
Salvia plants are a rich source of polyphenol compounds with over 160 identified
polyphenols, comprising an array of phenolic acids and flavonoids. [39]
Selected research studies: An extract of Salvia (sage) with anticholinesterase properties improves memory and attention in
healthy older volunteers(Scholey et.al. 2008) [40]
The study is randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced, five-period crossover. 20 volunteers (>65 years of age) received four active
doses of extract (167, 333, 666 and 1332 mg) and a placebo. The overall pattern of results is consistent with a dose-related benefit to processes
involved in efficient stimulus processing and/or memory consolidation rather than retrieval or working memory efficiency.
Effects of cholinesterase inhibiting sage (Salvia officinalis) on mood, anxiety and performance on a psychological stressor
battery(Kennedy et.al. 2006) [41]
30 healthy participants received placebo, 300 mg or 600 mg dried sage leaf on three separate days, 7 days apart. The findings indicate that the
lower dose reduces anxiety and the higher dose increases ‘alertness’, ‘calmness’ and ‘contentedness’.
 

Pine bark is long being used for scurvy and wound healing and now it’s a by-product
of timber industry. [42] Pines are native to the Northern Hemisphere and various pine
species grow in other parts of the world, such as North America, China, Russia, etc.
Maritime pine extract, for instance, contains 65%–75% oligomeric procyanidins and
polyphenolic monomers, phenolic, or cinnamic acids and their glycosides. [43]
Selected research studies: Improved cognitive performance after dietary supplementation with a Pinus radiata bark extract
formulation(Pipingas et.al. 2008) [44]
42 males aged 50–65 years participated in this double-blind, controlled study for 5 weeks, supplemented with either with Enzogenol® plus vitamin
C, or with vitamin C only. The findings from the treatment group demonstrated a beneficial effect on cognition in older individuals.
Pycnogenol® improves cognitive function, attention, mental performance and specific professional skills in healthy professionals
age 35–55(Belcaro et.al. 2014) [45]
60 subjects (range 35-55 years) took Pycnogenol®(i.e.,pine bark extract) (150 mg/day) in conjunction with a health plan or placebo for 12 weeks.
The study suggests pine bark supplementation appears to improve cognitive function and oxidative stress in healthy professionals.
 
 
Regulation:
 
Novel food status:
- Lion’s mane( Hericium erinaceus mushroom) is not clear and Lion’s mane (Hericium erinaceus dehydrated mycelium
powder) is novel food.
- All the other above-mentioned ingredients are non-novel food in Europe. L-Theanine extracted and isolated from
green tea(Camellia sinensis) is not novel only in food supplements. L-Theanine from other sources is novel food.[46][47]
EFSA authorized health claims:
- Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA): 1)DHA contributes to maintenance of normal brain function. 2) DHA contributes to the
maintenance of normal blood triglyceride levels. 3) DHA contributes to the maintenance of normal vision. 4)
Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake contributes to the normal visual development of infants up to 12 months of age.
5) Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) maternal intake contributes to the normal brain development of the foetus and
breastfed infants.
- A few health claims of the above-mentioned ingredients were summited and recorded in the file of consolidated list
of Article 13 health claims list of references received by EFSA.[48]

 

 

Commercial examples:

 

 
 
Clutch cognition(around € 2.8/Bottle)
Brand: Clutch cognition
Serving size 330 ml
 
Ingredients
Green tea extract, sage extract, green OAT* extract,
Vitamin C, Vitamin B5, carbonated water, isomaltulose
(6 %), guar bean fiber (0,9 %), natural lemon and
mango flavouring, acidity regulator (citric acid), natural
flavouring.
 
 
 

Mind Lab Pro(€44,25/bottle)
Brand: Opti-Nutra Europe
Serving size 2 capsules | Serving per container 30
 
Nutritional Information
Per serve
% NRV
Vitamin B6(from NutriGenesis®)
2.5 mg
179
Vitamin B9(from NutriGenesis®)
100 mcg
50
Vitamin B12(from NutriGenesis®)
7.5 mcg
300
Citicoline
250 mg
-
Bacopa Monnieri(as full spectrum extract 24% bacosides
with 9 bioactives)(aerial parts)
150 mg
-
Organic Lion's Mane Mushroom(full spectrum)(fruit)
500 mg
-
Phosphatidylserine(as Sharp-PS® Green from sunflower
lecithin)
100 mg
-
A-Acetyl L-Tyrosine
175 mg
-
L-Theanine(as Suntheanine®)
100 mg
-
Rhodiola Rosea(3% rosavins, 1% sadidrosides)(root)
50 mg
-
Maritime Pine Bark Extract(95% proanthocyanidins)
75 mg
-
- NRV not established
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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[8]Perry, N. S., Houghton, P. J., Theobald, A., Jenner, P., & Perry, E. K. (2000). In-vitro inhibition of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase by
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[9]https://www.efsa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/2017_09_DRVs_summary_report.pdf
[10]DeKosky, S. T., Williamson, J. D., Fitzpatrick, A. L., Kronmal, R. A., Ives, D. G., Saxton, J. A., ... & Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory (GEM) Study
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[13]Kennedy, D. O., Scholey, A. B., & Wesnes, K. A. (2000). The dose-dependent cognitive effects of acute administration of Ginkgo biloba to
healthy young volunteers. Psychopharmacology, 151(4), 416-423.
[14]Stough, C., Clarke, J., Lloyd, J., & Nathan, P. J. (2001). Neuropsychological changes after 30-day Ginkgo biloba administration in healthy
participants. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 4(2), 131-134.
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[17]Jeyasri, R., Muthuramalingam, P., Suba, V., Ramesh, M., & Chen, J. T. (2020). Bacopa monnieri and their bioactive compounds inferred
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[18]Stough, C., Downey, L. A., Lloyd, J., Silber, B., Redman, S., Hutchison, C., ... & Nathan, P. J. (2008). Examining the nootropic effects of a
special extract of Bacopa monniera on human cognitive functioning: 90 day double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial. Phytotherapy
Research: An International Journal Devoted to Pharmacological and Toxicological Evaluation of Natural Product Derivatives, 22(12), 1629-
1634.
[19]Suliman, N. A., Mat Taib, C. N., Mohd Moklas, M. A., Adenan, M. I., Hidayat Baharuldin, M. T., & Basir, R. (2016). Establishing natural
nootropics: recent molecular enhancement influenced by natural nootropic. Evidence-based complementary and alternative
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[20] Kennedy, D. O., & Scholey, A. B. (2003). Ginseng: potential for the enhancement of cognitive performance and mood. Pharmacology
Biochemistry and Behavior, 75(3), 687-700.
[21] Zhang, J. T., Qu, Z. W., Liu, Y., & Deng, H. L. (1990). Preliminary study on antiamnestic mechanism of ginsenoside Rg1 and Rb1. Chinese
medical journal, 103(11), 932-938.
[22]Geng, J., Dong, J., Ni, H., Lee, M. S., Wu, T., Jiang, K., ... & Malouf, R. (2010). Ginseng for cognition. Cochrane Database of Systematic
Reviews, (12).
[23]Reay, J. L., Kennedy, D. O., & Scholey, A. B. (2005). Single doses of Panax ginseng (G115) reduce blood glucose levels and improve
cognitive performance during sustained mental activity. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 19(4), 357-365.
[24] Stonehouse, W., Conlon, C. A., Podd, J., Hill, S. R., Minihane, A. M., Haskell, C., & Kennedy, D. (2013). DHA supplementation improved
both memory and reaction time in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled trial. The American of Clinical Nutrition, 97(5), 1134-1143.
[25]Yurko-Mauro, K., McCarthy, D., Rom, D., Nelson, E. B., Ryan, A. S., Blackwell, A., ... & Midas Investigators. (2010). Beneficial effects of
docosahexaenoic acid on cognition in age-related cognitive decline. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 6(6), 456-464.
[26]https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323144#_noHeaderPrefixedContent
[27]Yurko-Mauro, K. (2010). Cognitive and cardiovascular benefits of docosahexaenoic acid in aging and cognitive decline. Current Alzheimer
Research, 7(3), 190-196.
[28]Richardson, A. J., Burton, J. R., Sewell, R. P., Spreckelsen, T. F., & Montgomery, P. (2012). Docosahexaenoic acid for reading, cognition
and behavior in children aged 7–9 years: a randomized, controlled trial (the DOLAB Study).
[29]Rao, T. P., Ozeki, M., & Juneja, L. R. (2015). In search of a safe natural sleep aid. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 34(5), 436-
447.
[30]Baba, Y., Inagaki, S., Nakagawa, S., Kaneko, T., Kobayashi, M., & Takihara, T. (2021). Effects of L-theanine on cognitive function in middle
aged and older subjects: A randomized placebo-controlled study. Journal of Medicinal Food, 24(4), 333-341.Brain tonic
[31]Camfield, D. A., Stough, C., Farrimond, J., & Scholey, A. B. (2014). Acute effects of tea constituents L-theanine, caffeine, and
epigallocatechin gallate on cognitive function and mood: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition reviews, 72(8), 507-522.
[32] Hidese, S., Ogawa, S., Ota, M., Ishida, I., Yasukawa, Z., Ozeki, M., & Kunugi, H. (2019). Effects of L-theanine administration on stress
related symptoms and cognitive functions in healthy adults: a randomized controlled trial. Nutrients, 11(10), 2362.
[33]Baba, Y., Inagaki, S., Nakagawa, S., Kaneko, T., Kobayashi, M., & Takihara, T. (2021). Effects of L-theanine on cognitive function in middle
aged and older subjects: A randomized placebo-controlled study. Journal of Medicinal Food, 24(4), 333-341.
[34]Liu, J., Du, C., Wang, Y., & Yu, Z. (2015). Anti-fatigue activities of polysaccharides extracted from Hericium erinaceus. Experimental and
therapeutic medicine, 9(2), 483-487.
[35]Friedman, M. (2015). Chemistry, nutrition, and health-promoting properties of Hericium erinaceus (Lion’s Mane) mushroom fruiting
bodies and mycelia and their bioactive compounds. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 63(32), 7108-7123.
[36]Mori, K., Inatomi, S., Ouchi, K., Azumi, Y., & Tuchida, T. (2009). Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus)
on mild cognitive impairment: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Phytotherapy Research: An International Journal Devoted to
Pharmacological and Toxicological Evaluation of Natural Product Derivatives, 23(3), 367-372.
[37]Saitsu, Y., Nishide, A., Kikushima, K., Shimizu, K., & Ohnuki, K. (2019). Improvement of cognitive functions by oral intake of Hericium
erinaceus. Biomedical Research, 40(4), 125-131.
[38]Perry, E. K., Pickering, A. T., Wang, W. W., Houghton, P. J., & Perry, N. S. (1999). Medicinal plants and Alzheimer's disease: from
ethnobotany to phytotherapy. Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology, 51(5), 527-534.
[39]Lopresti, A. L. (2017). Salvia (sage): a review of its potential cognitive-enhancing and protective effects. Drugs in R&D, 17(1), 53-64.
[40]Scholey, A. B., Tildesley, N. T., Ballard, C. G., Wesnes, K. A., Tasker, A., Perry, E. K., & Kennedy, D. O. (2008). An extract of Salvia (sage)
with anticholinesterase properties improves memory and attention in healthy older volunteers. Psychopharmacology, 198(1), 127-139.
[41] Kennedy, D. O., Pace, S., Haskell, C., Okello, E. J., Milne, A., & Scholey, A. B. (2006). Effects of cholinesterase inhibiting sage (Salvia
officinalis) on mood, anxiety and performance on a psychological stressor battery. Neuropsychopharmacology, 31(4), 845-852.
[42]Rohdewald, P. J. (2005). Pycnogenol®, French maritime pine bark extract. Encyclopedia of dietary supplements, 1, 545-553.
[43] Rohdewald, P. (2002). A review of the French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol), a herbal medication with a diverse clinical
pharmacology. International journal of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, 40(4), 158-168.
[44]Pipingas, A., Silberstein, R. B., Vitetta, L., Rooy, C. V., Harris, E. V., Young, J. M., ... & Nastasi, J. (2008). Improved cognitive performance
after dietary supplementation with a Pinus radiata bark extract formulation. Phytotherapy Research, 22(9), 1168-1174.
[45]Belcaro, G., Luzzi, R., Dugall, M., Ippolito, E., & Saggino, A. (2014). Pycnogenol® improves cognitive function, attention, mental
performance and specific professional skills in healthy professionals age 35–55. J Neurosurg Sci, 58(4), 239-48.
[46]Sante, D. G. (2022). EU Novel food catalogue (v.1.1). Novel Food Catalogue.
https://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/novel_food/catalogue/search/public/index.cfm
[47]https://www.health.belgium.be/sites/default/files/uploads/fields/fpshealth_theme_file/lijst_not_nfs_planten_nl_fr_en.pdf
[48] Consolidated list of Article 13 health claims List of references received by EFSA. (2011).
https://www.efsa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/topic/ndaart13ref04.pdf
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VITAFOODS
2020-02-25
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We are sorry to inform you that the 2020 VITAFOODS was cancelled due to coronavirus and look forward to seeing you in 2021.
Hi Europe & Ni 2020
Hi
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We will attend the Hi Europe & Ni 2020, Messe Frankfurt, Germany, 1st-3rd December 2020, Booth# 30K70

CONTACT US

China headquarter 

Add:4A-Buliding A3, 2nd Liheng Industrial Park,Fanhuan Road,Hefei 230092,China

TEL: (+86) 551 62828690

Fax: (+86) 551 62828697

Email: sales@health-sources.com 

the Netherlands sales contact

Add: Nieuwe Binnenweg 89A, 3014 GE, 
Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Tel:
+31(0)655592543
Email: cheryl@health-sources.com

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